Press releases

Sir Stuart Etherington, chief executive of NCVO:

We know that charities deliver effective and efficient public services. Even though public service spending cuts are less than expected, if current trends continue, cuts to voluntary sector delivery will be deeper than cuts overall. It's time for a major review of how public service markets work so that the expertise and skills of charities can be better used to benefit the public.

65% of workers would choose employers that support volunteering, but businesses and charities aren’t working together

The National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO) and the CIPD, the professional body for HR and people development, have today launched new research into employer-supported volunteering (ESV). The research found a lack of understanding between charities and companies about the costs and benefits involved in ESV, with some companies unwilling to contribute to the costs involved in hosting volunteers. Similarly, some of the businesses interviewed reported that charities often overlooked the additional benefits of a one-off placement, including the potential of sponsorship or support from the company in the future.

Charities are seeking urgent reassurances from government over a threat to Lottery cash for good causes.

The National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO), which represents charities in England, and the charity leaders' network, ACEVO, said that plans were being made to raid Lottery cash to make up for cuts in arts and sports budgets.

Commenting on the appointment of Michael Grade, Lord Grade of Yarmouth, to chair the new fundraising regulator, Sir Stuart Etherington said:

Lord Grade is a substantial figure with the experience to drive through the changes that must be made. He is a highly experienced chair and he has a clear commitment to public service along with a strong understanding of marketing, not least from his seven years as chairman of Ocado. I have every confidence that under his leadership the new fundraising regulator will become the body it needs to be in order to secure public trust.

Commenting on the PAC report on Kids Company, Karl Wilding, director of public policy at the National Council for Voluntary Organisations, said:

This report will make extremely frustrating reading for the thousands of charities who have to submit highly detailed plans in order to have a hope of funding, and who work very hard to produce honest and accurate assessments of the difference they make.

Sir John Major's speech at the 18th annual Hinton lecture on 10 November 2015.

On 12 October the Minister for Civil Society, Rob Wilson MP and Sir Stuart Etherington co-hosted a meeting to discuss the implementation of the recommendations of Sir Stuart Etherington’s Review of Charity Fundraising Self-Regulation. The meeting was attended by key stakeholders in the sector including the Charity Commission, current regulators and representatives from charities.

The National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO) and the Association of Chief Executives of Voluntary Organisations (ACEVO) have agreed to work together to promote the positive impact of the voluntary sector. The decision was taken at a meeting last week of the chairs, vice-chairs and chief executives of the two umbrella organisations. This work is now underway.

Sir Stuart Etherington’s speech on local infrastructure, delivered at the Big Assist Beacon awards in Manchester on Monday 5 October 2015.

First of all can I thank you Alex for the opportunity to co-host this evening’s event and also for the great work GMCVO is doing in Manchester as the opportunities and challenges of devolution grow in the region.

Responding to the announcement by the Minister for Civil Society, Sir Stuart Etherington, chair of the cross party review of fundraising regulation and chief executive of the National Council for Voluntary Organisations said:

"I’m pleased the government has accepted our recommendations, there is a clear need for a more visible and effective regulator with tough new powers. The public have to know where to report their concerns and have confidence that action will be taken in relation to wrong doing. This will inevitably mean big changes in relation to how charities raise funds from the public.

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