Welfare reform research will inform future changes

NCVO is to undertake a major research project into the effects of recent welfare reforms on charities and their beneficiaries.

The year-long project will consider the effectiveness of recent welfare reforms and identify the impacts they have had. The review will take evidence from charities and is intended to inform thinking on any future changes to welfare policy.

The project launched today with a call for evidence from charities on the impact reforms have had on their beneficiaries and the ways in which charities have changed the support they provide to beneficiaries.

As part of the project, NCVO will also create resources aimed at helping charities understand the multiple welfare changes and the different ways in which beneficiaries may be affected. The research will present examples of how charities are adjusting to changing demands, as well as providing a platform to share examples of best practice.

Charlotte Ravenscroft, head of policy and research at NCVO, said:

'Many charities have long called for reform of the welfare system, but the reality of recent changes has been difficult for some of the people they support. In particular, some groups have had to deal with multiple changes simultaneously. This research aims to identify strengths and weaknesses in the current programme of welfare reform in order to best inform any future changes. Charities have direct experience of providing advice and support to people affected by changes to social security and are well-placed to provide feedback on what works and what doesn't.'

The call for evidence is open now and runs until 31 March. Charities can participate by filling in the questionnaire at http://www.ncvo.org.uk/welfarecallforevidence

Notes

For more information, please contact Aidan Warner, external relations manager, NCVO, on 020 7520 2413 or
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NCVO represents the voluntary sector, with over 10,000 members from the largest household name charities to the smallest community groups.

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