NCVO responds to Charity Commission research on public trust and confidence

Sir Stuart Etherington, chief executive of the National Council for Voluntary Organisations said:

Charities have listened to public concerns – and have taken concerted action to ensure that members of the public can have complete confidence in what they do.

Charities, and all that they achieve, only exist thanks to their supporters and the wider public. We must ensure that all charities – regardless of size or sector – are well-run and well-regulated and that the mistakes of last summer are not repeated.

This year, charities have established a tough new fundraising regulator, working to stricter standards than ever before, in order to ensure that supporters are always treated with respect.

A new fundraising preference service mean people who have found themselves on a large number of mailing or call lists and feel unable to get off them, or who have relatives in this position, will have a way to opt out.

And charities are now working towards ensuring that they always have clear consent before they contact anyone. Already we’ve seen major charities such as RNLI and Cancer Research UK take this step.

Charities are well aware they have a significant responsibility in society, and they want to ensure that they live up to the standards that the public rightly expect of them.

Charities are also working to strengthen their governance, including reviewing the sector’s code of good governance practice. They are also working with their representative bodies to explore better ways to explain how they work to ensure the public can have confidence in them.

Notes for editors

  • For further information please contact Chloe Stables, External Relations Manager at NCVO on 07507 558 597 or at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Sir Stuart Etherington chaired last year's cross-party review of fundraising regulation
  • A new fundraising regulator will be operational from 7 July
  • The code of fundraising practice has been updated – it explicitly bans charities from selling personal data or sharing anybody’s data without their express permission.
  • New legislation ensures that vulnerable people are protected from any inappropriate fundraising activity and there is a new legal requirement to ensure charities have the right policies in place.
  • Many charities are changing the way they fundraise – only contacting people that have expressly given their permission, introducing new supporter or donor charters, or putting in place better systems to oversee fundraising activity.
  • The code of good governance will be updated and re-launched during the 2016 Trustee Week
Site by Clickingmad