Press releases

The National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO) and Action with Communities in Rural England (ACRE) yesterday announced a new partnership in order to strengthen the support available to rural communities.

NCVO has announced plans to mark its 100th anniversary with the launch of a new book and a series of events celebrating the achievements of voluntary action over the last century.

Super-major charities (defined as those with an income over £100m) are experiencing similar trends and challenges with income to the rest of the voluntary sector, new analysis of data collected for the NCVO UK Civil Society Almanac has shown.

Data for the period 2009/10 - 2015/16 shows that charities with an annual income of £100m or over have grown to account for a fifth of the voluntary sector's total income. £100m+ charities are growing in number, and so is their collective income, which increased from £6.4bn in 2009/10 to £9.4bn in 2015/16.

Commenting on her resignation as minister for sport and civil society, Sir Stuart Etherington, chief executive of the National Council for Voluntary Organisations, whichrepresents charities, said Tracey Crouch had been a passionate and inspiring minister for civil society:

Tracey has been a passionate and inspiring minister for civil society. Her strong leadership in creating a cross-government civil society strategy demonstrated a real commitment to supporting the work of charities across the country.

NCVO has welcomed new new government commitments on safeguarding in charities.

Karl Wilding's presentation outlining NCVO’s thinking on how Brexit will shape the landscape for the voluntary sector, what we can do to prepare for all eventualities and what it might mean in the longer term. Presented at the VONNE Conference, 18 October 2018 

The National Council for Voluntary Organisations, the representative body for charities, and the Foundation for Social Improvement, a leading source of training for smaller charities, today announced the creation of a strategic partnership to promote each other’s training and support.

Commenting on the publication of the Charity Commission's statement of strategic intent, Peter Kellner, chair of NCVO, said:

Baroness Stowell is right to demand the highest standards from charities. The great majority that maintain those standards feel betrayed when a small minority fall short. The Commission deserves support for its efforts to provide a clear regulatory framework and a focus on where things go wrong.

Devolved health bodies should be incentivised to measure and reduce health inequalities and improve wellbeing, according to an influential group of health charities.

The government’s new civil society strategy has delivered a range of positive announcements, but implementation will be key, said the National Council for Voluntary Organisations, which represents charities and volunteering.

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